THANKSGIVING IS A LIE! …or is it?

f8ea675a39edcba7be42352f563d5c6c So for me and my family Thanksgiving is when my whole family somehow fits into one house, watches the Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade, then watches football. My Grammie and my Mom spend the entire day in the kitchen cooking appetizers like Cranberry Tartlets and making enough food for dinner to feed an entire village. Plus pies. We all go around the room at dinner and say what we’re thankful for that year, and after that we attempt to eat as much food as we can. This day, as we all know, is obviously why leggings and stretchy pants were invented.

But what’s the real story of Thanksgiving? I know that the Native American’s and the British settlers came together to celebrate crops, creating Thanksgiving, but other than that I know nothing. Also, I’ve heard from many that the story we’ve all been told about Thanksgiving isn’t really true at all. Don’t worry, I did some research about how Thanksgiving actually came to be the holiday we love today.

While there were several large feasts that were considered celebratory “thanksgivings,” the one that started the holiday we celebrate occurred in Plymouth, Mass. in the fall of 1621. There are only two written accounts of the occurrences of this day. Both show that after a very long year filled with disease and hardship, the Pilgrims gave thanks to God for their blossoming crop season which not only gave them food, but hope for a new life at Plymouth, which had only just begun when they reached Plymouth Rock in December of 1620.

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The Pilgrim’s from Plymouth pretty much show Thanksgiving as a great feast during which everyone came together and they all feasted for days as one big happy family. This isn’t true. Actually, the Wampanoag Indians (the Native tribe that was there before the Pilgrims) weren’t even invited. One pilgrim told the Wampanoag Indians after the feast had already started, and when the tribe arrived, they didn’t eat anything because there wasn’t enough for left over for all of them. It wasn’t until some of the native Indians brought back deer from hunting that the natives joined the Pilgrims in their feast.

This date is considered the beginning of what we now celebrate as Thanksgiving, even though we didn’t start to celebrate annually on the same day until centuries later. Now we eat turkey, instead of deer, but we still eat corn like they did, and cranberries like they did (even if ours come out of a can) and plenty of other food that still holds the traditional foods fromfb56b4e66ae81f9378d997f5a1ef262c the original feast. Except now we have awesome things like the parade, and football. And Ovens to cook the pies in. I’m especially thankful for that one because my Grammie makes the best pecan pie ever.

So that’s Thanksgiving! If you’d like to see any of the information I talked about in this blog you can go to these two websites, which show the Pilgrim side of Thanksgiving along with the Wampanoag side of Thanksgiving.other food that still holds the traditional foods from the original feast. Except now we have awesome things like the parade, and football. And Ovens to cook the pies in. I’m especially thankful for that one because my Grammie makes the best pecan pie ever.

Happy Turkey Month!

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